Excerpt from John Kerry speech: "Time Is Not On Our Side!"

Speaking at COP22, outgoing Secretary of State and one of the world's most vocal champions of action to tackle the manmade climate crisis, John Kerry, delivered a cautiously optmistic but realistic address to the press at COP22 in Marrakesh. This speech was in contrast to Kerry's upbeat speech in Paris at COP21 a year earlier when the nightmarish reality of a Republican administration in the US was unimaginable. The world has changed and in this excerpt Kerry identifies the challenges and the realities of what we are facing.

Click here to watch the full John Kerry Speech

Greenland scientist Jason Box

“The current expected climate trajectory… effectively dooms the ice sheet!”

Spelte Glacier loses “Manhattan Island” sized chunk of ice

Professor Jason Box, a glaciologist at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, describes how the “largest ice shelf in Greenland has a northern tributary… and now this Manhattan Island sized ice shelf fragment has broken away” in what he calls a “spectacular event”.

Read more ...

Podcast: The Washington to Cambridge (UK) Climate Call

These two experts about the risks posed by climate change and the urgency with which we need to respond.

This call is hosted by Nick Breeze of Envisionation.co.uk and covers the topics of climate science, political response and the need for a wider understanding of the huge threat humanity faces from abrupt climate change.

Read more ...

Anthony Hobley: Vote Leave would result in "A bonfire of environmental regulations in this country!"

In a Vote leave scenario, Anthony Hobley, financial analyst, The Carbon Tracker, says: “I don’t think it is far fetched to imagine a bonfire of environmental regulations in this country!”

Read more ...

Wine production will be turned on its head by regional heating from climate change

New research may well point to the fact that recent warming has produced more reliable vintages but if we look at some of the indicators of what the rest of this century really heralds then the forecast for many regions, including Britain, becomes much less rosy.

Retrospective analysis: 1600 - 2000

Looking back at 400 yrs of wine harvest records may seem like a longtime and certainly enough to base a study of viticulture on, however, we know that for the last ten thousand years we have been in a relatively stable climate period with a certain range of temperature variability that we have not strayed outside of. Whenever we have come close to the boundary of that variability, it has represented great hardships and often death for many people.

Read more ...

Royal Society panel exposes weak link in UK’s post-COP21 action plan

Panelists:
Lord Nicholas Stern, FBA FRS (Chair)
Professor John Loughhead OBE FREng FTSE - Chief Scientific Advisor at the Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC)
Matthew Bell - Chief Executive at the Committee on Climate Change
Professor Joanna Haigh CBE FRS - Co-Director of the Grantham Institute - Climate Change & the Environment
Jeremy Leggett - Founding Director, Solarcentury; Founder & Chairman, Solaraid; Chairman Carbon Tracker Initiative
Jon Williams - Partner, Sustainability & Climate Change, PwC

Read more ...

Dr John Schellnhuber (PIK) defines the roles of civil society and investors Post COP21 [interview]

In this interview, founding Director of the influential Potsdam Institute For Climate Impact Research (PIK), Dr John Schellnhuber stresses that in the wake of the Paris Agreement, “We can save the planet, we can create a very sustainable economy that serves everybody on this planet but we have to do it very quickly.”

Watch / Read Interview

Sea-level rise past and future: robust estimates for coastal planners

Source: Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)


Sea-levels worldwide will likely rise by 50 to 130 centimeters by the end of this century if greenhouse gas emissions are not reduced rapidly.

Read more ...

COP21: Political Shortfall & The Role of Civil Society [Part 2]

In part 2 of this Post COP21 series of mini documentaries I have focused on the limits of what politics can deliver as to way of setting a level of expectation. The Paris Agreements excludes some key details that have a material impact on the lives of billions of people. The next step is to engage civil society with these issues and use our collective power to create a momentum for change.

Read more ...

More posts by Nick Breeze

Earlier this week Environment Minister Michael Gove stated that he was convinced “climate change is a danger”, stating that it “is one of the biggest threats and challenges to biodiversity in the UK”.

By localising the issue to the UK, Gove seeks to belittle the global risk posed by climate change. This week, German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s chief science adviser and founding director of the Potsdam Institute, Professor Schellnhuber was in London speaking at the Royal Society. When I asked him to respond to the Environment Minister’s comments he replied:  

In part 1 of this wide ranging interview, Anton Golub discusses why the world needs Lykke, the truth about financial regulators and why only 1% Initial Coin Offerings (ICO’s) they assess make it onto the exchange.

Anton Golub: The core vision of Lykke is the vision of Richard Olsen, the founder of Lykke. I am a cofounder. I met him seven years ago when I joined him for an internship.

I sat down to eat my croissant and he sat down next to me and said: “Anton, we have to completely  change the financial system. It totally doesn’t work. Everything is broken inside.”

 

Interview by Nick Breeze with Dr Natalia Shakhova and Dr Igor Semiletov

A new scientific paper published in Nature Communication Journal demonstrates that the mechanisms of destabilisation of subsea permafrost, contrary to previous claims, provide new insights into increased emissions from the worlds largest deposits of methane, that exists in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS).

The subsea permafrost has for thousands of years acted as a seal, restricting the flow of gas through the water column to the atmosphere. This paper clearly shows that permafrost degradation and the occurrence of gas migration pathways are key factors in controlling the emissions.  

 

The lady who ushered in the Paris Agreement now wants to ramp up the pace and ensure the world reaches peak emissions by 2020, leading to total decarbonisation by 2050. The whole campaign hinges on the a new report that cites 2020 as a critical milestone for stemming the effects of climate change.

Christiana Figueres is persuasive and influential but in light of recent world events that include the destabilisation of the EU as a political block, and the openly anti-climate action administration of President Trump, it is very clear that the world has changed since Paris.

READ THE COMMENT: Does Figueres interview give clues as to why we went backwards from Copenhagen to Paris?

 

Centre for Science and Policy (CSaP): 2017 Climate Change Seminar Series

Science, politics, knowledge management, innovation and markets all play a role in climate change action, but what is the role of the University of Cambridge as an ‘anchor institution’ for these? Bringing together speakers spanning the worlds of research and policy, this series of events will explore how the multifaceted aspects of climate change action can come together to help us make the right decisions for the long run.  

The window of opportunity is closing… but the price of failure is still too high!

The rate of ecological destruction is now so bad that the fate of our civilisation literally hangs in the balance. The loss of the Arctic polar ice cap, the melting from above and below of Antarctica, the culling and collapse of forests and dying oceans, failing ecosystems, our atmosphere burdened with hundreds of billions of tonnes of extra greenhouse gases, and still each week scientists report more broken links in the chains of interconnectedness that sustain each one of us, rich and poor, on this planet. Despite all this, the great human enterprise built on a foundation of carbon, rumbles on in search of new fixes.