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Sir Partha Dasgupta Pt. 2 How do we put a price on nature?

Dasgupta: "It is a never ending quest to value nature... nevetheless it has to be done, or the future looks bleak!"

In this second part of the interview, Sir Partha Dasgupta discusses the role of natural capital in our lives both in the developing world and in the developed, more urban environments and the links between both. He also tackles the problem of puting a value on nature.

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Sir Partha Dasgupta Interview Pt.1 - What is "Natural Capital"?

Sir Partha Dasgupta’s work is groundbreaking in its attempt to integrate the true value of nature into the economics of international, national, regional, local and even household accounting.

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97% of People want climate change policy action (as UK Gov. lets polluters off the hook!)

The following announcement by the United Nations shows findings that people are now coming together and calling for action to tackle the enormous threat to all of our lives from climate change impacts.

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Interview: Polar ice expert, Professor Peter Wadhams,

discusses the increased dangers of climate change in the Arctic, the potential for runaway impacts and what politicians should decide when they meet in Paris

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Islamic Community prepares to make a global declaration on climate change in Istanbul ahead of Paris UN Climate Talks

The Prophet Muhammad taught Muslims to be custodians and stewards of the earth, he said: “Allah has made the earth green and beautiful, and He has placed you as stewards on it.”

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Interview with Sir Jonathon Porritt - Business & climate change

Sir Jonathon Porritt is a leading environmentalist and writer with over 40 years in this field. He is one of the cofounders of 'Forum for the Future' working very closely with businesses and governments around the world to solve complex sustainability challenges.

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Interview with Lord Martin Rees Part 2 - Preserving the Earth for future generations

Martin Rees - On creating a stable world: "...the momentum can be sustained if people really care about the world their children and grandchildren will live in, and feel some obligation to feel that the world is more stable." 

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Interview With Lord Martin Rees Part 1

Part 1: Former President of the Royal Society, Author of 'Our Last Century' and Founder of the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk (CSER), Lord Rees discusses how critical the roles of all of us are in ensuring politicians take the right decisions that will affect life not just in the next few decades but in centuries to come: 

"...we can be technical optimists but we can’t be political optimists, bearing in mind that politicians often don’t even react to the most obvious moral imperatives..."

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Germany imposes harsh terms on Greece as Europe defiles the word “Union”

“Zeus, having fallen in love with Europa, a daughter of Agenor, king of Tyre in Phoenicia, assumed the form of a beautiful white bull. He seemed so gentle, the girl was enchanted by him and was eventually persuaded to climb on his back. Before she knew what was happening, she was riding out to sea, on the way to Crete. He brought her to Gortyn, where they became lovers. One of their three sons was Minos, [legendary king of the ancient Minoan palace at Knossos]. Crete then, not only gave Europe its name, it was where Europe began, a truth Cretans have always known.”
From ‘Crete’ by Barry Unsworth, pub. 2004, National Geographic Society

symi town viewSymi Town from the top of the Kalistrata

I have just returned from the Greek island of Symi in the Dodecanese after a tense but beautiful week watching European ministers talk dirty about what to do about the Greek situation. The last time I was in Symi in 2008, the US investment bank Lehman Brothers collapsed leaving fellow tourists huddled around laptops in coffeeshops trying to asses the risk posed to their investments and the whole economic system entered the eye of the storm.

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More posts by Nick Breeze

Earlier this week Environment Minister Michael Gove stated that he was convinced “climate change is a danger”, stating that it “is one of the biggest threats and challenges to biodiversity in the UK”.

By localising the issue to the UK, Gove seeks to belittle the global risk posed by climate change. This week, German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s chief science adviser and founding director of the Potsdam Institute, Professor Schellnhuber was in London speaking at the Royal Society. When I asked him to respond to the Environment Minister’s comments he replied:  

In part 1 of this wide ranging interview, Anton Golub discusses why the world needs Lykke, the truth about financial regulators and why only 1% Initial Coin Offerings (ICO’s) they assess make it onto the exchange.

Anton Golub: The core vision of Lykke is the vision of Richard Olsen, the founder of Lykke. I am a cofounder. I met him seven years ago when I joined him for an internship.

I sat down to eat my croissant and he sat down next to me and said: “Anton, we have to completely  change the financial system. It totally doesn’t work. Everything is broken inside.”

 

Interview by Nick Breeze with Dr Natalia Shakhova and Dr Igor Semiletov

A new scientific paper published in Nature Communication Journal demonstrates that the mechanisms of destabilisation of subsea permafrost, contrary to previous claims, provide new insights into increased emissions from the worlds largest deposits of methane, that exists in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS).

The subsea permafrost has for thousands of years acted as a seal, restricting the flow of gas through the water column to the atmosphere. This paper clearly shows that permafrost degradation and the occurrence of gas migration pathways are key factors in controlling the emissions.  

 

The lady who ushered in the Paris Agreement now wants to ramp up the pace and ensure the world reaches peak emissions by 2020, leading to total decarbonisation by 2050. The whole campaign hinges on the a new report that cites 2020 as a critical milestone for stemming the effects of climate change.

Christiana Figueres is persuasive and influential but in light of recent world events that include the destabilisation of the EU as a political block, and the openly anti-climate action administration of President Trump, it is very clear that the world has changed since Paris.

READ THE COMMENT: Does Figueres interview give clues as to why we went backwards from Copenhagen to Paris?

 

Centre for Science and Policy (CSaP): 2017 Climate Change Seminar Series

Science, politics, knowledge management, innovation and markets all play a role in climate change action, but what is the role of the University of Cambridge as an ‘anchor institution’ for these? Bringing together speakers spanning the worlds of research and policy, this series of events will explore how the multifaceted aspects of climate change action can come together to help us make the right decisions for the long run.  

The window of opportunity is closing… but the price of failure is still too high!

The rate of ecological destruction is now so bad that the fate of our civilisation literally hangs in the balance. The loss of the Arctic polar ice cap, the melting from above and below of Antarctica, the culling and collapse of forests and dying oceans, failing ecosystems, our atmosphere burdened with hundreds of billions of tonnes of extra greenhouse gases, and still each week scientists report more broken links in the chains of interconnectedness that sustain each one of us, rich and poor, on this planet. Despite all this, the great human enterprise built on a foundation of carbon, rumbles on in search of new fixes.