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Peabody 80ft wall of coal

Bill McKibben, co founder of 350.org: 

“This is a company that wilfully and deliberately sought to delay, dismantle or destruct climate action. Perhaps if they had spent more time and money diversifying their business rather than on lobbying against climate action and sowing the seeds of doubt about the science, they might not have joined the long (and ever growing) list of bankrupt global coal companies.”

Ilmi Granoff, Attorney and Senior Researcher at the Overseas Development Institute (ODI). P: +1 212 729 8123

“We know their playbook. As coal majors like Peabody lose out to cleaner technologies in their home markets, they pitch their industry as the solution to poverty.  But increasingly developing economies - from Ethiopia to China - aren’t buying the pitch. Cleaner technologies are delivering better on everything from household energy access to national energy security.”

Dr. Alison Doig, Principal Climate Change Advisor, Christian Aid: 

“We are starting to see the dawn of a new clean industrial era, in which coal power belongs in the past. It is time to make a big shift towards a renewable world which delivers sustainable energy for all, providing power for the world’s poorest without increasing the risks of climate change.”

Mary Anne Hitt, director of Sierra Club’s Beyong Coal Campaign, said:

"The biggest coal giant has fallen, and Peabody Energy’s bankruptcy should serve as a wake-up call to anyone promising that coal’s glory days will return. As Peabody grapples with the reality that the world is turning away from coal, it’s essential that it doesn’t turn away from its obligations to workers, communities, and the environment. 

“Unfortunately, Peabody has a history of spinning off its responsibilities into smaller companies that seem built to fail, while taxpayers are left holding the bag. We need to make sure the former energy giant is held accountable for every promise it’s made and that its decline leaves its commitments in the best shape possible. In addition to Peabody doing its part, we also need Congress to do theirs -- which means investing more federal dollars in economic redevelopment and diversification in coal communities, shore up health care and pension plans for coal workers and their families, and ensure toxic mining sites are cleaned up and reclaimed.

“As we transition to the clean energy economy, it’s essential that we don’t forget the immense contributions that coal communities have made to America and that we secure every family’s livelihood as we transition to new economic opportunities.”